Delhi University admissions: Get your best four score right to book your seat

Now that the Delhi University has announced its first list of cutoffs for admission in its colleges, all that is standing between applicants and a seat in their preferred college is your ‘best four’ score.

Students have until June 28 to visit colleges and secure a seat in these highly sought-after colleges. However, one must first calculate the ‘best four’ score to ascertain if they have cleared the cutoff grade to be eligible for one of the 56,000 seats available in 63 DU colleges.

DU asks its students to calculate the aggregate of the ‘best four’ subjects, to see if they qualify for admission based on the cutoff. This may sound simple enough, but with different courses having different requirements for calculating the best four, this process can get daunting.

You can find the different guidelines for different courses given below:

Science courses

For most Bachelor of Science courses, Physics and Chemistry are mandatory. If the course has a Biology component, such as Zoology or Botany (Hons) courses, then you would need to have done Biology too. For some other courses Mathematics is mandatory.

A few courses such as Biotechnology, etc, will require both Biology and Mathematics.

These courses will be used to calculate your best of four score and the scores for these subjects should have been on a 70/30 basis, where 70% of the marks is for theory and 30% is for practical. If it does not follow this division, then the scores will be adjusted to fit this ratio.

Mathematical Science courses

There are four Mathematical Science courses, such as Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. Mathematics is mandatory to apply for these.

The best of four for these courses is calculated as the aggregate of your scores in one language subject, Mathematics and the scores of any two subjects from List A.

List A is a compilation of academic courses, published by the DU. If any of the elective courses do not fall in list A, then 2.5% will be deducted from your aggregate.

DU

Arts Courses

There are many BA (Hons) and BA programmes that applicants can choose from. The best of four for BA (Hons) programme is calculated as aggregate of the scores in a language subject, the subject in which you would like to do your honours program in and any two subjects from List A.

If you do not include the subject in which you want to do the honours programme in, or if your electives are not from List A, then 2.5% each will be deducted for these.

Commerce courses

Delhi University is well known for its B Com (Hons) and B Com programmes. Students should have studied Mathematics to apply for BCom (Hons).

Students need to use their scores in one language subject (either English or Hindi) and select three subjects from lists C1 or C2 to get their best four score. Like List A, these are compilations of subjects that are prepared by the DU.

However, here there is a small catch. If all three elective courses are from List C1, then the student would not face ant deduction. But for each subject taken from List C2, there will be a deduction of 1%.

 

Day 1: Students wait and watch as few take admissions despite low cutoffs in Delhi University

The first day of admissions at most Delhi University colleges, under the first cut-off list, was a slow affair with many colleges recording only a handful of admissions.

The process was also plagued with issues of payment, as the portal was not working earlier in the day. Some applicants, despite meeting the required cut-off, could not confirm their seats as they could not get the printout of the college form on time.

One such applicant was Bindu Patnana from Chhattisgarh, who waited the entire morning for her DU college form, but in vain. “I will now have to extend my stay in Delhi for two more days to get admission on Tuesday,” said Bindu, who wishes to pursue BA (Hon) History from Sri Venkateswara College.

According to Venkat Kumar, admission convener from the college, the applications were pending for approval as the online link through which the principal had to grant them were not working. “There were problems in the portal till evening, due to which students had to face problems,” said Kumar.

The college staff said it may be one reason why the number of admissions on the first day was not huge. Principal of a north campus college, who did not wish to be named, said, “The university portal, through which the student is expected to pay the admission fees online, opened a little later in the day, by around 1.45 pm. This also slowed down the admission process a little.”

Atma Ram Sanatan Dharma College principal Gyantosh Jha said, “During the day, there were problems with the portal, due to which fee payment was not happening. “

However, a DU offical said that the university opened the portal for fee payment after 4pm and that it was a planned decision. “We had decided to open the portal after 4pm and informed the same to colleges as well,” an official said.

Despite the lowered cut-offs, many colleges saw fewer students visiting on the first day of admissions to secure a seat. Miranda House admitted 86 students on the first day, with 15 of them opting for the BA Programme. BSc (Hon) in Botany had the fewest takers, with just one person getting admitted to the course.

At Shri Ram College of Commerce, around 100 out of the 624 seats were full by the end of the day. At Kirori Mal College, only about 147 admissions were done against the 1,350 seats.

“The number of students seeking admission picks up on the third day of the admission, which is the last day to get admission under the first list. But it looks like we will announce a second cut-off for most courses,” said Dinesh Khattar, acting principal of KMC.

Some DU colleges claimed that this was a normal phenomenon on the first day of admissions. “Students usually indulge in ‘admission tourism’ on the first days, where they go visit multiple campuses and ‘window shop.’ They then start clamouring for seats on the last day,” said the vice principal of a north campus college.

Students and officials were also plagued with concerns over not being able to access the college portal.

The students, who did make it to the colleges, expressed their surprise and joy at the reduced cut-offs at many of the DU colleges.“The cut-offs in many colleges are lower than last year, which is a good thing. It gives many more students opportunities to pursue degrees at DU colleges,” said Shambhavi Ojha, who is hoping for a seat in Political Science (Hon) at Daulat Ram College.

There were many who were also surprised at the dip. “I was expecting it to increase this year. I had read that the number of students in India who had scored more than 95% (in the CBSE Class 12 exams) had increased. I thought this would also increase the cut-offs at DU,” said Shanna Jain, who secured a seat at Kirori Mal College for English (Hon).

 

 

 

Delhi University: Direct admission for Paralympic, Olympic participants, other sports stars

Ten students, who represented India in international sports meets, have been given direct admission to Delhi University colleges this year.

DU colleges have a sports quota of up to 5%, and almost 13,000 students had applied to these seats this year. The students usually have to go through rounds of trials to be chosen for these seats, however, some are given ‘direct admission.’

This provision is reserved for students who have represented India in “Olympic games/ World Championship/ World Cup/ Commonwealth games/ Asian Games/ Asian Championships/ South Asian Games/ Paralympic games” according to the DU Sports Council’s guidelines.

“These are the highest tournaments for sports as recognised by the government of India. We are trying to honour their performance and achievements. Their participation (in these tournaments) is not just an honour for them, but also others,” explained Anil Kumar Kalkal, the director of DU sports Council.

This year, ten students, including eight shooters, one javelin thrower, and one swimmer have been given direct admission.

These sportspersons include, parathlete Rinku who represented India in the Summer Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, swimmer Shivani Kataria, who represented India at the Rio Olympics in 2016, and shooters such as Asees Chhina, Diwakar Yadav, Fateh Singh Dhillon, and Simran Preet Kaur, who were part of the ISSF Junior World Cup held in Germany in 2016.

Delhi University

Others like double trap shooter Bhowneesh Mendiratta and shotgun shooter Manavaditya Singh Rathore, represented India in the International Junior Shotgun Cup held in Finland in 2016, trap shooter Lakshay participated in the 13th Asian Championship held in Kuwait in 2015, and Vidhi Jain, who participated in the 9th Asian Championship held in Iran in 2016,

“These students can get directly admitted to those DU colleges which offer their particular sport,” explained Kalkal.

Cricketer Pawan Negi, who was part of the Indian T20 squad in 2016 and also plays with the Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League, had also applied under the sports quota to the DU, however, due to errors in the uploaded documents, he will have to participate in the trials to be eligible for a seat, said DU officials.

“He uploaded a certificate that says he participated in the Vijay Hazare trophy, which is a national level tournament. We are bound by guidelines and particular about document requirements. So he will have to participate in the trials,” said Kalkal.

College rockstar to sports dude: Ten types of students you’ll meet in Delhi University

Delhi University (DU) is a different world altogether! A complete shift from school life, you can equate your life in DU to that of a sitcom. You get to taste awesome food, find new hangouts, learn the new tricks of being a college-goer, but what really makes it all interesting are the fun characters that you meet (some of whom become BFFs).

From the social media queen who loves to update her followers about every second of her college life to the nerd who lives to score well in exams, we bring you a list of ten types of DU students that you will surely come across on your first day of college.

Delhi University

GYM FREAK

 

Gym is life for this one. You can recognise him from afar, flexing his muscles in tight T-shirt. His conversations, mostly, would revolve around supplements and how much he lifts. This one mostly rolls with his type only, unless of course, he is mentoring you to get out of your skinny (or fat) form and become one with the gym rats.

DU FASHIONISTA

 

If you see someone strutting their stuff like they’re at a fashion week, you know you’ve spotted the DU fashionista. With their branded ensembles, perfect hair, makeup and expensive perfume, they have a million giveaways. But, be cautious when you approach this one… they already have all the attention they need.

‘STEREOTYPICAL’ HOSTELER

 

This variety is mostly chilled out, and is only active only during certain phases in the academic year. You can spot them in comfortable clothing (mostly in what they slept); they are great at taking power naps and are the ones who have the most pull in college ( all thanks to the bond they form with their hostel seniors). Resourceful and sloth-like, all at the same time.

NERD EXPRESS

 

Always on time, ready with all the answers and mostly the ones to remind the teacher about assignment submissions, the nerd express is an easy spot. They’re always bringing their A-game on when it comes to scoring high. Befriend them early on, and you would surely reap the benefits.

DRAMA QUEEN

 

They love attention, and will go to any length to ensure the spotlight stays on them. Shrill screams, loud laughs and dramatic narration (sometimes fights, too) are their defining features. Ignoring this one is a hard task — you’ll mostly fail, but if you do succeed, they might just create a scene about that.

PARTY ANIMAL

 

Freshers’ party, club hopping and various chill scenes at Hauz Khas Village are just some of the things this one will always talk about. ‘Where’s the party, ya?’ is like common punctuation with them and will be dropped in almost every conversation you have with them. They’re also your one stop when it comes to finding the best party spots with amazing deals (they might just have contacts their too!).

SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERT

 

Click, caption, update, repeat — consider this the mantra of this type. You’d find this one on every social media platform possible, and they also will be your one stop for all things Internet. Real life is just an extension of their virtual life, and long conversations without checking the phone might only be possible if they run out of mobile data.

SPORTS DUDE

 

College life for them is mostly limited to the field. They join college through sports quota and spend a majority of their time skipping classes to better their game. The coach is the one faculty person in their life and hard routines are worse nightmares for them than college exams. If you do befriend this one, keep them on speed dial for the classic DU fight.

COLLEGE ROCKSTAR

 

Popular among the ladies, this one leads the college band. You’d mostly spot him strumming his guitar, preparing for the next big performance or just moving in the popular crowd. They’re mostly clad in the trendiest of clothes and most of their look (tattoos and hairdo included) are a tribute to their favourite band. You know you’re one of the popular ones if you befriend this one!

JUGAAD CENTRAL

 

One of the most important entities to roam the college grounds, this one is indispensable if you want college to be a smooth ride. From last minute fest passes to all the proxy attendance, this one will have a contact for everything (or at least a solution to it). Treat this one nicely and enjoy the perks!

Have more to add to the list? Tell us in the comments below.

 

 

Delhi University admissions: Get your best four score right to book your seat

Now that the Delhi University has announced its first list of cutoffs for admission in its colleges, all that is standing between applicants and a seat in their preferred college is your ‘best four’ score.

Students have until June 28 to visit colleges and secure a seat in these highly sought-after colleges. However, one must first calculate the ‘best four’ score to ascertain if they have cleared the cutoff grade to be eligible for one of the 56,000 seats available in 63 DU colleges.

DU asks its students to calculate the aggregate of the ‘best four’ subjects, to see if they qualify for admission based on the cutoff. This may sound simple enough, but with different courses having different requirements for calculating the best four, this process can get daunting.

You can find the different guidelines for different courses given below:

Science courses

For most Bachelor of Science courses, Physics and Chemistry are mandatory. If the course has a Biology component, such as Zoology or Botany (Hons) courses, then you would need to have done Biology too. For some other courses Mathematics is mandatory.

A few courses such as Biotechnology, etc, will require both Biology and Mathematics.

These courses will be used to calculate your best of four score and the scores for these subjects should have been on a 70/30 basis, where 70% of the marks is for theory and 30% is for practical. If it does not follow this division, then the scores will be adjusted to fit this ratio.

Mathematical Science courses

There are four Mathematical Science courses, such as Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. Mathematics is mandatory to apply for these.

The best of four for these courses is calculated as the aggregate of your scores in one language subject, Mathematics and the scores of any two subjects from List A.

List A is a compilation of academic courses, published by the DU. If any of the elective courses do not fall in list A, then 2.5% will be deducted from your aggregate.

DU

Arts Courses

There are many BA (Hons) and BA programmes that applicants can choose from. The best of four for BA (Hons) programme is calculated as aggregate of the scores in a language subject, the subject in which you would like to do your honours program in and any two subjects from List A.

If you do not include the subject in which you want to do the honours programme in, or if your electives are not from List A, then 2.5% each will be deducted for these.

Commerce courses

Delhi University is well known for its B Com (Hons) and B Com programmes. Students should have studied Mathematics to apply for BCom (Hons).

Students need to use their scores in one language subject (either English or Hindi) and select three subjects from lists C1 or C2 to get their best four score. Like List A, these are compilations of subjects that are prepared by the DU.

However, here there is a small catch. If all three elective courses are from List C1, then the student would not face ant deduction. But for each subject taken from List C2, there will be a deduction of 1%.

 

7 Best Places to Eat Tandoori Momos in Delhi

momos

Delhi loves momos. Be it street vendors, cafes or restaurants, they all are trying to take our love for momos up a notch by making them exciting. Besides the regular steamed chicken or vegetables momos, you will find a whole new variety to indulge in. Paneer momos, fried momos, chocolate momos and afghani malai momos are giving the original steamed version of the dumpling tough competition. One of the most loved variant is the Tandoori Momo (momos grilled in a tandoor). A North Indian Tadka given to this Tibetan delicacy, results in one of the best fusion foods of recent times. Here are 7 places in Delhi that serve the most delicious Tandoori Momos.

1.  QD’s

Student studying at the Delhi University swear by this multi-cuisine café. It serves many delights ranging from noodles and fish fingers to shahi paneer, but a hot selling item here, that you will spot on every table is their signature Tandoori Momo. This is why they always place a bottle of mint chutney along with the red chilly garlic chutney on every table that serve as the best accompaniments to Tandoori Momos. Their momos are quite big in size and loaded with a spicy masala.

Where: QD’s, Hudson Lane, GTB Nagar
Cost of one plate of Tandoori Momos: INR 165

2.  Hunger Strike

Hunger Strike has garnered a huge fan following in just three years of its establishment. Grilled in a tandoor, and tossed in a yoghurt and red chilli chutney, their momos are lip-smacking. They are served with mint chutney, chopped coriander leaves and onions.

Where: C-9, Amar Colony Market, Lajpat Nagar 4, New Delhi
Cost of one plate of Tandoori Momos: INR 130

momos

Hunger strike momos
Photo Credit: Sushmita Sengupta

3. 36 Chowranghi Lane

This is the hub for the mouth-watering kathi rolls and has recently become the go-to joint for amazing Tandoori Momos as well. Placed on skewers, pieces of momos interspersed with onions are grilled uniformly in the tandoor, and served hot with mint chutney and red chilly chutney.

Where: 93, Opposite Venkateswara College, Satyaniketan, New Delhi
Cost of one plate of Tandoori Momos: INR 130

4.  Momos Point

Momos Point in Kamala Nagar doles out a plethora of momos at pocket-friendly prices. They serve eight pieces of momos per plate, unlike most of the other eateries.

Where:27 UB, Jawahar Nagar, Kamla Nagar, New Delhi
Costfor one plate of tandoori momos: INR 140 for one plate

5. Wow Momos

Why should you restrict yourself to a plate of tandoori momos, when you can enjoy a bite of a tandoori momo burger too? A momo burger or a ‘moburg’ may sound absurd, but it is the latest sensation in the food world. Your favourite tandoori momos are placed between burger buns and slathered with chutney. This fusion is a must try.

Where: 289, Opposite Venkateshwar College, Satyaniketan, New Delhi
Cost of one plate of Tandoori Momos: INR 160

momos

Tandoori momos; Photo Credit: facebook/Freaky foodie

6.  Chalte Firte momos

Another student-friendly haunt in Kamala Nagar market, this place is bustling with college-goers gorging on their melt-in-mouth momos. You must try their tender and creamy Tandoori Afghani Momos served with mint chutney. They also have several other quirky versions like the Fried Gravy Momos, Steamed or Fried Butter Masala Momos or Onion Capsicum Masala Gravy Momos.

Where: 32, UB, Jawahar Nagar, Bangla Road, Kamla Nagar
Cost of one plate of Tandoori Momos: INR 160

momos

Tandoori momos; Photo Credit: Facebook/chalteyfirteymomos

7.  Café Brown Sugar

The tiny café located in Greater Kailash has a diverse menu serving everything from pastas and salads to sandwiches. But, what catches one’s attention is their range of healthy wheat momos. They use wheat as their base for the dumplings, and do quite a good job at it. You cannot miss out on their Crispy Tandoori Steamos, skewered and grilled with tandoori spices and served with mint and red chilly chutney.

Where: M-73, M Block Market, Greater Kailash (GK) 1, New Delhi
Cost of one plate of Tandoori Momos: INR 160

Uber Said to Have Hired Law Firm to Probe How It Handled Delhi Rape Case

Uber Technologies has hired a law firm to investigate how it obtained the medical records of a Delhi woman executive who was raped by an Uber driver in 2014. The review will focus in part on accusations from some current and former employees that bribes were involved, two people familiar with the matter told Reuters.

The law firm O’Melveny & Myers LLP, which is in the early stages of the probe, was hired by the ride service after employees gave contradictory accounts of how Uber obtained the medical records, one of the people said.

The firm is also exploring whether former Chief Executive Travis Kalanick knew how Uber came into possession of the records, the person added.

Kalanick through a spokesman declined to comment. Uber also declined to comment, and O’Melveny & Myers did not respond to a request for comment. Members of Uber’s board were briefed about the investigation in recent days, shortly before five major Uber investors sent a letter to Kalanick to demand his resignation, said the person. The probe was likely one reason the board turned against Kalanick, who stepped down on Tuesday, the first person said.

The investigation is ongoing and has not reached any conclusions on whether Uber improperly obtained the records. Reuters has no evidence that bribery occurred.

The rape survivor from Delhi sued Uber last week, accusing the ride service operator of improperly obtaining and sharing her medical records. The suit said that shortly after the rape occurred, former Uber Asia chief Eric Alexander “met with Delhi police and intentionally obtained plaintiff’s confidential medical records.”

Alexander, through spokeswoman Heather Wilson, denied paying any bribes and said that the files containing the victim’s records had been obtained through appropriate, legal methods.

Uber Said to Have Hired Law Firm to Probe How It Handled Delhi Rape Case

A Delhi police spokesman did not answer multiple phone calls from Reuters to seek comment. The rapist was convicted in 2015.

According to a person familiar with conversations between Kalanick and Alexander, the two executives had discussed obtaining the victim’s records because they suspected the rape might have been fabricated by Uber rival Ola to damage the company.

Another person said Alexander showed the medical files to colleagues in New Delhi more than once.

Wilson denied that Alexander had discussed or shared the records with colleagues. She said that Alexander believed the victim was raped and never expressed the view that it was a set up. Uber fired Alexander earlier this month.

Kalanick, 40, announced late on Tuesday that he was resigning as chief executive, though he would remain on the board of Uber. He said he had accepted “the investors’ request to step aside so that Uber can go back to building rather than be distracted with another fight.”

Privately held Uber has grown from startup to a global ride service valued at $68 billion in less than a decade, driven by Kalanick, who set the tone of a company that challenged laws and norms to succeed.

Confidence in Kalanick had been strained this year by claims of sexual harassment in the company and a lawsuit accusing Uber of benefiting from trade secrets stolen from self-driving cartechnology from Alphabet Inc’s Waymo.