DU PG admit card 2017 released at du.ac.in, exams to begin from July 1

The Delhi University has activated the admit card link of PG, M.Phil and PhD entrance exams. These exams will start from July onwards and the applicants can download their admission ticket from official portal. After getting delayed twice, the online registration for the exam had started from June 12 and closed on June 22, 2017. DU initially planned to conduct the entrance examination online but had to change the decision.

The candidates can view the admit card on the official website – admission.du.ac.in/pg2017.

du.ac.in, du pg admit card, du pg admit card 2017, du admit card,

DU PG admit card 2017, here’s how to check
Step 1: Vist the official website mentioned above
Step 2: On the homepage, click on PG link
Step 3: You’ll be directed to a new page. Enter your registered email id and password
Step 4: Your admit card will be displayed
Step 5: Download and take a print out
Remember to carry the admission ticket as it has important details like venue, exam time etc.

As per Maharaj K Pandit, chairperson of the admission committee, around 650 seats would be announced for M Phil course and around 850 seats would be allotted for Ph D courses.Admission process: The admission will be done on the basis of offline entrance examination and 50 per cent on merit basis. The exam was held in six centres – Chennai, Delhi, Guwahati, Kolkata, Nagpur and Varanasi between July 1 and 6.

DU admissions: Keep your documents handy, get the best of four calculation right

Gear up to grab a seat at their dream college as Delhi University (DU) released its first cutoff list on Friday evening.

The admission process for the first cutoff list will be on from June 24 to June 28, following which the university will release its second list on July 1.

HT spoke to a few DU students who shared their experience of struggling to find the way to offices in colleges, losing their original certificates to hiring e-rickshaw drivers as guardians to get rooms in hostels.

Many students recounted the first day of admission to be full of struggle. “The first day of admissions was such a blur. I kept getting lost in the college campus and had to try really hard to find my way back to the admin office each time,” said Divya Ahuja from Shri Ram College of Commerce.

Akshay Mehta from Hans Raj College said that many out-station students, who did not go through the dates and guidelines, faced many issues. “I am from Kolkata and I didn’t know that the day the cutoff list is out, it is also the first day of admissions. So, one day I’m sitting at home and the next, I’m boarding a flight to Delhi because I am already a day late for admissions,” he said.

On a lighter note, an outstation student further said, “I have friends who have had to hire e-rickshaw drivers as local guardians to get admission into the hostel as that is a requirement.”

The best four calculations can leave the best of applicants stumped, so you may want to pay close attention to the norms to avoid mistakes.

“After confirming my admission in a college after the first cutoff by four teachers in the panel, getting my documents attested for BSc (H) Statistics, waiting for four hours and completing the whole procedure, the last teacher in the panel says ‘Sorry, you are 0.25% short’,” said Anjali Sharma, a student of College of Vocational Studies.

Many students also reported losing original documents during the admission process.

Nikita Gupta from Lady Shri Ram Collegeg said, “When the second list of cut offs was released, I had gone to a DU college to withdraw my admission so that I could migrate to LSR. It turned out that the college had lost my original documents and I had to search for them all by myself.”

Unfortunately, Gupta is not alone; students like Vaishnavi Gosain from Atma Ram Sanatan Dharam College have also had similar experiences.

“I cried for an hour in front of the administration staff of the college because after standing in a queue for three hours to get myself admitted, I found out that they had misplaced my original certificates. They found them later but till then I had made up my mind to not to take admission in this college,” she said.

DU

There were some who faced issues as they had uploaded incorrect documents, while others had to prove that they were aspirants and not parents to enter the college.

“In my DU form I uploaded my original birth certificate as proof of birth and completed the process, only to realise a day before the deadline that it was the Class 10 marksheet which was required as date of birth proof. I had to redo the form all over again,” he said.

Sanket Aggarwal from CVS was stopped at the gate just because of his appearance. “I have a very tall and muscular build and I like to keep a well groomed beard. So, when I went to Maharaja Agrasen College, the guard stopped me and asked ‘Aapka bacha kahan hai? Parents are not allowed inside.’ I was stunned and had to show him all my documents to prove that I was a student,” said Aggarwal.

 

 

DU admissions: Economics, English, BCom honours only for those who scored 90% and above

The first Delhi University (DU) cut-off for many courses has dipped across colleges, a first in many years, but the DU dream still remains far for those who have scored below 90% and wish to study Honours courses in Economics, Bcom and English.

All the colleges that offer these courses have kept the cut-off at 90% and above, with 95% and above being the cut-off for a majority of colleges.

There are 38 colleges offering Economics (Hon) and 35 of them have kept the cut-off at 95% and above. The rest three have kept it at 90% and above, and none has below 90%. The highest cut-off is at SGTB Khalsa College at 98.25%.

Similarly, all 46 colleges that offer English (Hon) have kept the cut-off at 90% and above; 27 of them have set the limit at 95% and above. English was the second most sought after course with 1,28,842 applicants opting for the course.

BCom (Hon) is available at 90% and above at all 54 colleges that offer the course, and in fact, at 48 colleges, the cutoff is 95% and above.

Economics (Hon) and BCom (Hon) are among the top 10 courses in terms of the number of applicants opting for them. “The cut-offs for these courses are usually kept higher to avoid over-admission. In off-campus colleges, the cut-off may come down in the second list,” said a DU official, who did not wish to be named.

DU admissions

But students who have scored below 90% need not lose hope, as there are options available for them in many colleges for sought out courses like History, Political Science, and BA Programme. Other courses like Hindi, Sanskrit, and Social Work are also available mostly in the range of 70-80%.

BA Programme, which is the most sought after course at DU, is available at 90% and below, with 30 colleges out of the total 50 that offer the course. Over 1.4 lakh students have applied for this course.

Out of the 42 colleges that offer History, 18 have kept the cut-off below 90%. The cut-off is 75% at Bhagini Nivedita and 78% at Bharati College.

Political Science is available at 90% and above at 35 colleges out of the total 45 that offer the course, but three colleges have a lower cut-off — Bhagini Nivedita at 80%, Shyama Prasad Mukherjee at 72%, Mata Sundri College at 74.5%.

Sanskrit, which is offered in 28 colleges, has the highest cut-off at 85% at Dyal Singh and lowest at Gargi College at 50%. Only in six colleges it is in the range of 70-80%, and the rest 22 colleges has it below 70%.

 

 

DU admissions: Entrance test for elementary education course on July 2

Delhi University will be conducting the entrance test for 400 seats under Bachelor of Elementary Education (B.El.Ed.) on July 2.

The course is offered only to women candidates and is available in eight colleges. The entrance test for the course will be held from 12pm-2pm in 18 centers across the country.

THE COURSE

B.El.Ed. Programme is a four-year integrated professional degree programme of Elementary Teacher Education. It is bilingual and interdisciplinary in nature.

Students study different theory courses in education, liberal options and school-based practicum such as school contact programme and school internship. Students also have year-long interactive sessions (workshops) with experts in the field of theatre, craft, story-telling and self-development.

“This programme aims to produce elementary teachers of high calibre,” the official said.

After doing the course, students can opt to become a teacher, pursue higher studies or appear for government jobs. Many students are directly placed in schools in the final year of their course, the official said.

DU

ENTRANCE TEST

The selection will be made according to the merit list that will be prepared on the basis of marks secured in the entrance test.

The two-hour test will have Class 10 level questions from English and Hindi, Social Science, Mathematics and Science. The entrance test will be of Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) format. There will be no descriptive questions and the test shall be bilingual (English and Hindi), wherever applicable.

“The entrance test is in MCQ format. There will be 100 questions. For each correct answer, a student shall score four marks and for each wrong answer, one mark will be reduced.” said a DU official.

ELIGIBILITY

Those applying for the course must have passed the Class 12 examination with a minimum aggregate of 50% marks in each of the four subjects and an aggregate of 50% in the qualifying examination, university officials said.

 

DU Admissions: Cluster Innovation Centre has many choices for you

Delhi University offers unique courses at the Cluster Innovation Centre (CIC), with a keen focus on innovation.

The courses are not just aimed at preparing students for a fast-changing innovative world but they also use unique concepts such as ‘meta college’ and ‘meta university’ to allow them to experience multiple colleges and universities during the course.

The CIC offers two undergraduate programs, BTech in Information Technology and Mathematical Innovation and BA (Hons) in Humanities and Social Sciences, and a postgraduate course, MSc in Mathematical Education.

BTech in Information Technology and Mathematical Innovation:

This four-year undergraduate degree course, which has been on offer in DU since 2012, is open to all who have studied Mathematics and have secured a best four score of at least 60%.

The course looks to provide students with practical knowledge, in addition to theoretical prowess, when it comes to innovation and technology. The curriculum is evaluated on the basis of both projects that students are expected to complete and theoretical exams.

“The course was designed keeping innovation in mind. DU is the only Indian university that provides a course of this kind,” said Jogeswar Purohit, an assistant professor for the course.

Admission to the 40 seats for this course will be on the basis of an entrance test expected to be conducted early next month. The entrance exam will be based on mathematics and science subjects.

Image result for DU Admissions

Interested students can apply to the course on the DU online admission portal, under the entrance-based undergraduate programs application.

However, the CIC does not have a placement cell and does not invite companies and others for recruitment. “Almost all of our students have been placed but we do not have a placement cell,” he said.

“We encourage students to link up and think of their own start-ups. In fact, after they complete their degree, a selected few students are allowed to incubate their projects up to one year at the centre. Students even get funding up to two lakh rupees from ministry of micro, small and medium enterprises,” said Purohit, while explaining how the course nurtures an entrepreneurial spirit.

BA (Hons) in Humanities and Social Sciences:

This three-year undergraduate programme is one of its kind, as it is a ‘meta college’ programme. “Students will be able to choose classes from different DU colleges and design their own degree,” explained Geetanjali Kala, an assistant professor at DU and the woman behind the course.

Students can tailor their degree to their needs, as they are allowed to take courses from any of the DU colleges, other than St Stephen’s college. If admitted to one of the 40 seats available for the course, students will be assigned a mentor, who will help them ascertain their interests and pick courses best suited to their passions.

In the first and sixth semester, the students will be expected to attend classes at the CIC.

Anyone who has a 60% best four score, which includes a modern Indian language or English, are eligible to apply, and will be selected based on an entrance test.

“The entrance exam will look at subjects like history, geography, political science and include some general science and mathematics. We take current affairs seriously here, and students should expect a few questions related to this, especially news related to marginalized communities,” she said.

Question papers from previous years’ entrance exams are also available on the centre’s website for any who may want to peruse it.

MSc in Mathematics Education:

This two year inter-disciplinary course would be best suited for those who are looking to teach mathematics in the future.

“Degrees usually teach you one or the other, how to teach or mathematics. This course is tailor-made to ensure students not only learn mathematics but also know how to teach it,” explained Pankaj Tyagi, the coordinator for the course.

The meta university course, jointly run by Delhi university and Jamia Milia Islamia, allows students to utilise resources available at both colleges. Graduates can apply to one of the 20 seats available through DU’s online PG application, before registrations close on Wednesday.

The course is evaluated with 60% for projects and 40% for theory, and works in tandem with JMI’s AJK Mass Communication Research Centre. “This is where the inter-disciplinary aspect of the course comes in. Students are trained in how to use media to teach mathematics as well,” said Tyagi.

DU admissions: Keep your documents handy, get the best of four calculation right

Gear up to grab a seat at their dream college as Delhi University (DU) released its first cutoff list on Friday evening.

The admission process for the first cutoff list will be on from June 24 to June 28, following which the university will release its second list on July 1.

HT spoke to a few DU students who shared their experience of struggling to find the way to offices in colleges, losing their original certificates to hiring e-rickshaw drivers as guardians to get rooms in hostels.

Many students recounted the first day of admission to be full of struggle. “The first day of admissions was such a blur. I kept getting lost in the college campus and had to try really hard to find my way back to the admin office each time,” said Divya Ahuja from Shri Ram College of Commerce.

Akshay Mehta from Hans Raj College said that many out-station students, who did not go through the dates and guidelines, faced many issues. “I am from Kolkata and I didn’t know that the day the cutoff list is out, it is also the first day of admissions. So, one day I’m sitting at home and the next, I’m boarding a flight to Delhi because I am already a day late for admissions,” he said.

On a lighter note, an outstation student further said, “I have friends who have had to hire e-rickshaw drivers as local guardians to get admission into the hostel as that is a requirement.”

The best four calculations can leave the best of applicants stumped, so you may want to pay close attention to the norms to avoid mistakes.

“After confirming my admission in a college after the first cutoff by four teachers in the panel, getting my documents attested for BSc (H) Statistics, waiting for four hours and completing the whole procedure, the last teacher in the panel says ‘Sorry, you are 0.25% short’,” said Anjali Sharma, a student of College of Vocational Studies.

Many students also reported losing original documents during the admission process.

DU

Nikita Gupta from Lady Shri Ram Collegeg said, “When the second list of cut offs was released, I had gone to a DU college to withdraw my admission so that I could migrate to LSR. It turned out that the college had lost my original documents and I had to search for them all by myself.”

Unfortunately, Gupta is not alone; students like Vaishnavi Gosain from Atma Ram Sanatan Dharam College have also had similar experiences.

“I cried for an hour in front of the administration staff of the college because after standing in a queue for three hours to get myself admitted, I found out that they had misplaced my original certificates. They found them later but till then I had made up my mind to not to take admission in this college,” she said.

There were some who faced issues as they had uploaded incorrect documents, while others had to prove that they were aspirants and not parents to enter the college.

“In my DU form I uploaded my original birth certificate as proof of birth and completed the process, only to realise a day before the deadline that it was the Class 10 marksheet which was required as date of birth proof. I had to redo the form all over again,” he said.

Sanket Aggarwal from CVS was stopped at the gate just because of his appearance. “I have a very tall and muscular build and I like to keep a well groomed beard. So, when I went to Maharaja Agrasen College, the guard stopped me and asked ‘Aapka bacha kahan hai? Parents are not allowed inside.’ I was stunned and had to show him all my documents to prove that I was a student,” said Aggarwal.

 

Remembering DU days: Actor Gulshan Grover says nobody leads a wild life at SRCC

“ I had to get more than 90% to get in. So, I couldn’t contain my happiness when the admission was confirmed,” says the actor, The years spent at DU gave him strength, vision and a foundation for his acting career.“As DU’s winter festivals [cultural fests] were fantastic and interactive, I rose as an actor,” says Grover. who has been praised for the portrayal of villainous characters in films such as Ram Lakhan (1989) and Dilwale (1994). Grover, who lived on the outskirts of Delhi, had to change three buses everyday to reach the university. Speaking fondly of that time, he says, “I used to walk six-seven kilometres, from my place, to Zakhira [in West Delhi] and then take a bus to Kashmiri Gate or Kamla Nagar to reach the University.”

 Shri Ram College of Commerce
Studying at SRCC was an eye-opening experience, as he saw students from different backgrounds. “It was interesting to meet kids, who were sure to inherit various industries, after learning commerce at the college. Then there were also common people, like me, who did exceptionally well, such as Rajat Sharma [senior journalist] and Vijay Goel [Union Minister of Youth Affairs and Sports], or a few others whose parents had made certain achievements in life,” he says.

“On Sundays, we’d have big fantastic, legit parties. Shri Ram is not a wild college. It’s not a college where anybody can afford to be wild”

Grover shares that he would often stay back at the hostel, to rehearse for plays and at times for group studies too. “I loved the life of hostellers. I envied them. We looked at the hostel boys as ‘Oh my god, what a life, how lucky they are’. They didn’t have to go back [home] and stand in the queue in the morning, to wait for the university special bus and dread missing it because then one would have to change three buses to reach college! They would go back to the hostel, change, and eat some nice lunch and rest.” Grover adds that he would go outside the campus with his friends, to the little shacks for bread pakoras and tea. “We would have a khata (account) running somewhere (laughs), where we ate and pay weekly or monthly, depending on the money in our pocket,” he says. Another thing he enjoyed about his time at SRCC, was the “fantastic” and “legit” parties on Sundays. However, he adds, “Shri Ram is not a wild college. It’s not a college where anybody can afford to be wild.”

Grover became the president of the Fine Arts Society at SRCC and still remembers his camaraderie with his seniors. “Arun Jaitley [present Finance Minister] was our senior. We learnt a lot from his dynamic leadership qualities. Rajat Sharma was a heavy duty winner in debates and was fiery and would work in a systematic way. Being the president of the society, I was responsible for sending him to different colleges in the university, and I used to be 100 percent sure that he would bring a gold medal for the college,” he says. .

“Arun Jaitley [present Finance Minister] was our senior. We learnt a lot from his dynamic leadership qualities. Rajat Sharma was a heavy duty winner in debates and was fiery and would work in a systematic way.”

When he ventured in Bollywood, it was the lessons learnt at SRCC that made him take wise career decisions. “The film industry wanted you to have work [experience] in films. There was no clear way to become an actor in Bollywood. As I had not been to Mumbai, I didn’t even know where it was and how it worked. But I had learnt the value of building a brand because of the commerce I studied at SRCC. It was extremely useful to me in understanding and deciphering the entertainment business when I came here (Mumbai) to work in Bollywood,” he signs off.