Four Things You Should Check Before Buying a Broadband Connection

Are you on in the market for a broadband connection? Getting flabbergasted by the innumerable Internet plans offering varied* Internet speeds – with that asterisk leading to terminologies you barely understand? The truth is that you are not alone. Finding a consistent, high-speed Internet connection without burning a hole in one’s pocket has become quite a task these days.

For Indians living in Tier-1 and Tier-2 cities, the daily requirements are now such that you need a high-speed Internet connection; if you’re a photographer who needs up upload a portfolio, a parent working from home who needs to access the company’s server on the cloud, an entrepreneur with an Internet-based startup working to carve a niche, a seller who needs to upload products to e-commerce websites, or even a student who wants to spend time on social media, play games, or download torrents – your requirements can be anything and everything.

To ensure that you are aware of exactly what you are getting from your Internet Service Provider (ISP) as a part of your subscription plan, here’s a list of four key things that you should know and consider before you take any decision. With

1. Fibre vs. copper cable
Wired broadband with copper cable is very common in India and is typically offered along with a fixed landline connection by the ISP. It is a fairly old technology (called DSL) dating back to the years when the lines were only supposed to transmit voice.

There have been several advancements in this technology (ADSL, VDSL. VDSL2+ etc). However, even with the latest advancement, the upload speed you can get is between 5Mbps and 10Mbps, and download speeds range between 15Mbps and 70Mbps, and that too with fluctuations.

The launch of fibre cables has initiated a new era in the country with far superior bandwidth. So, you should opt for a Fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) i.e. fibre broadband connection, which is built for data transmissions and offers high-speed Internet, often at the same or lower rates, depending on the ISP.

Most ISPs intend to cover all Tier-1 & Tier-2 cities with fibre optic cables by the end of this year. Technologically speaking, the core of a fibre cable is made of glass, which is an insulator so it is immune to many environmental factors such as temperature, noise, or electromagnetic interference, which affect copper cables. It is lightweight, thin, secure and more durable. The transmission losses are also drastically reduced with fibre cables so, it ensures faster data transmission and is less error prone.

Four Things You Should Check Before Buying a Broadband Connection

2. Broadband usage limits
In India, most of the “unlimited” broadband plans are regulated with bandwidth caps, or Fair Usage Policy (FUP). This is usually mentioned upfront, but you want to find out whether your ISP is counting both upload and download usage, as this varies from provider to provider.

If an ISP is counting upload usage as well, you might not have downloaded anything, but simply sharing photos and videos on social media could lead to using up your data limits. It’s important to know this before choosing any Internet plan – consider both your upload and download requirements, before selecting a provider and plan that is suitable for you.

3. Contention ratio
While speed and FUP are usually mentioned upfront, contention radio is usually not. However, it is a key metric that measures the maximum number of users that can concurrently share the fixed bandwidth on a line. So, despite opting for a high-speed Internet connection, if the number of such users accessing it is large, it means that the contention ratio is high, and thus the resultant Internet speed per user will also often be less.

For instance, if the contention ratio is 1:8 then up to 8 people may simultaneously share the bandwidth. In the recent past, as the number of users in India started multiplying at a rate faster than the available infrastructure, the quality of connection and Internet speeds have suffered. Most India ISPs presently offer a contention ratio of 1:30.

4. Upload speeds
Another important detail that is usually glossed over is the upload speed of your connection. The advertised Internet speeds in India are almost always applicable for downloads only.

The term symmetric speed refers to an Internet connection offering equal upload and download speeds. A decade ago, people used Internet primarily for downloading. That’s still important if you’re watching a movie on Netflix or reading the news on your favourite websites.

But these days, people are just as likely to upload content to the Internet, whether it’s for gaming, social media (with photos, videos, and audio clips), work related uploads of large documents, or even to make voice or video calls via the Internet. In all these scenarios, upload speeds are as important to the consumer as the download speeds.

For consumers, switching to fibre will help with better and more reliable connectivity, a 1:1 contention ratio, and symmetric upload speeds, and with growing competition, you should have multiple options to choose from.

Irrespective of the fact that you are already using a broadband or will be purchasing a connection for the first time, it’s best to get acquainted with the terminologies of your Internet plan to make the best out of it. Do your research, and you can easily find an ISP offering the plan that’s most suitable to your requirements, with terms and conditions that you can’t comprehend.

 

Delhi University admissions: Get your best four score right to book your seat

Now that the Delhi University has announced its first list of cutoffs for admission in its colleges, all that is standing between applicants and a seat in their preferred college is your ‘best four’ score.

Students have until June 28 to visit colleges and secure a seat in these highly sought-after colleges. However, one must first calculate the ‘best four’ score to ascertain if they have cleared the cutoff grade to be eligible for one of the 56,000 seats available in 63 DU colleges.

DU asks its students to calculate the aggregate of the ‘best four’ subjects, to see if they qualify for admission based on the cutoff. This may sound simple enough, but with different courses having different requirements for calculating the best four, this process can get daunting.

You can find the different guidelines for different courses given below:

Science courses

For most Bachelor of Science courses, Physics and Chemistry are mandatory. If the course has a Biology component, such as Zoology or Botany (Hons) courses, then you would need to have done Biology too. For some other courses Mathematics is mandatory.

A few courses such as Biotechnology, etc, will require both Biology and Mathematics.

These courses will be used to calculate your best of four score and the scores for these subjects should have been on a 70/30 basis, where 70% of the marks is for theory and 30% is for practical. If it does not follow this division, then the scores will be adjusted to fit this ratio.

Mathematical Science courses

There are four Mathematical Science courses, such as Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. Mathematics is mandatory to apply for these.

The best of four for these courses is calculated as the aggregate of your scores in one language subject, Mathematics and the scores of any two subjects from List A.

List A is a compilation of academic courses, published by the DU. If any of the elective courses do not fall in list A, then 2.5% will be deducted from your aggregate.

DU

Arts Courses

There are many BA (Hons) and BA programmes that applicants can choose from. The best of four for BA (Hons) programme is calculated as aggregate of the scores in a language subject, the subject in which you would like to do your honours program in and any two subjects from List A.

If you do not include the subject in which you want to do the honours programme in, or if your electives are not from List A, then 2.5% each will be deducted for these.

Commerce courses

Delhi University is well known for its B Com (Hons) and B Com programmes. Students should have studied Mathematics to apply for BCom (Hons).

Students need to use their scores in one language subject (either English or Hindi) and select three subjects from lists C1 or C2 to get their best four score. Like List A, these are compilations of subjects that are prepared by the DU.

However, here there is a small catch. If all three elective courses are from List C1, then the student would not face ant deduction. But for each subject taken from List C2, there will be a deduction of 1%.

 

DU admissions: Keep your documents handy, get the best of four calculation right

Gear up to grab a seat at their dream college as Delhi University (DU) released its first cutoff list on Friday evening.

The admission process for the first cutoff list will be on from June 24 to June 28, following which the university will release its second list on July 1.

HT spoke to a few DU students who shared their experience of struggling to find the way to offices in colleges, losing their original certificates to hiring e-rickshaw drivers as guardians to get rooms in hostels.

Many students recounted the first day of admission to be full of struggle. “The first day of admissions was such a blur. I kept getting lost in the college campus and had to try really hard to find my way back to the admin office each time,” said Divya Ahuja from Shri Ram College of Commerce.

Akshay Mehta from Hans Raj College said that many out-station students, who did not go through the dates and guidelines, faced many issues. “I am from Kolkata and I didn’t know that the day the cutoff list is out, it is also the first day of admissions. So, one day I’m sitting at home and the next, I’m boarding a flight to Delhi because I am already a day late for admissions,” he said.

On a lighter note, an outstation student further said, “I have friends who have had to hire e-rickshaw drivers as local guardians to get admission into the hostel as that is a requirement.”

The best four calculations can leave the best of applicants stumped, so you may want to pay close attention to the norms to avoid mistakes.

“After confirming my admission in a college after the first cutoff by four teachers in the panel, getting my documents attested for BSc (H) Statistics, waiting for four hours and completing the whole procedure, the last teacher in the panel says ‘Sorry, you are 0.25% short’,” said Anjali Sharma, a student of College of Vocational Studies.

Many students also reported losing original documents during the admission process.

Nikita Gupta from Lady Shri Ram Collegeg said, “When the second list of cut offs was released, I had gone to a DU college to withdraw my admission so that I could migrate to LSR. It turned out that the college had lost my original documents and I had to search for them all by myself.”

Unfortunately, Gupta is not alone; students like Vaishnavi Gosain from Atma Ram Sanatan Dharam College have also had similar experiences.

“I cried for an hour in front of the administration staff of the college because after standing in a queue for three hours to get myself admitted, I found out that they had misplaced my original certificates. They found them later but till then I had made up my mind to not to take admission in this college,” she said.

DU

There were some who faced issues as they had uploaded incorrect documents, while others had to prove that they were aspirants and not parents to enter the college.

“In my DU form I uploaded my original birth certificate as proof of birth and completed the process, only to realise a day before the deadline that it was the Class 10 marksheet which was required as date of birth proof. I had to redo the form all over again,” he said.

Sanket Aggarwal from CVS was stopped at the gate just because of his appearance. “I have a very tall and muscular build and I like to keep a well groomed beard. So, when I went to Maharaja Agrasen College, the guard stopped me and asked ‘Aapka bacha kahan hai? Parents are not allowed inside.’ I was stunned and had to show him all my documents to prove that I was a student,” said Aggarwal.

 

 

Huawei Mate 10 with bezel-less display and four cameras launching soon

Huawei has been launching several smartphones in the market within the last couple of months. While it seems that the Chinese manufacturer is on a launching spree, the company is going to unveil the Huawei Mate 10 soon.

We say this as we have been hearing a lot of rumors about the device. Moreover, an industry insider has claimed on Weibo that the successor to the Mate 9 will be launching this fall. He has also revealed that the smartphone will come with an almost bezel-less display.

Well, this little information doesn’t really come as a surprise since 2017 has seen many smartphones with minimal bezels. Unfortunately, none of the other details has been revealed by the post. However, thanks to the earlier leaks, we have quite a fair idea about what the Huawei Mate 10 will bring to the table. Most significantly, it is rumored to feature dual cameras on both its front and back. So, the phone would come with four cameras.

Huawei Mate 10 with bezel-less display and four cameras launching soon

Display-wise, the handset is said to come with a 6-inch screen with the aspect ratio higher than that of the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus. Some reports also suggest that the fingerprint scanner will be placed below the display. It means that the Huawei Mate 10 could come feature a physical home button that will double function as a fingerprint scanner. Other than that, it is expected to be powered by the Kirin 970 processor and it will probably run on Android 7.1.1 Nougat right out of the box.

Delhi University admissions: Get your best four score right to book your seat

Now that the Delhi University has announced its first list of cutoffs for admission in its colleges, all that is standing between applicants and a seat in their preferred college is your ‘best four’ score.

Students have until June 28 to visit colleges and secure a seat in these highly sought-after colleges. However, one must first calculate the ‘best four’ score to ascertain if they have cleared the cutoff grade to be eligible for one of the 56,000 seats available in 63 DU colleges.

DU asks its students to calculate the aggregate of the ‘best four’ subjects, to see if they qualify for admission based on the cutoff. This may sound simple enough, but with different courses having different requirements for calculating the best four, this process can get daunting.

You can find the different guidelines for different courses given below:

Science courses

For most Bachelor of Science courses, Physics and Chemistry are mandatory. If the course has a Biology component, such as Zoology or Botany (Hons) courses, then you would need to have done Biology too. For some other courses Mathematics is mandatory.

A few courses such as Biotechnology, etc, will require both Biology and Mathematics.

These courses will be used to calculate your best of four score and the scores for these subjects should have been on a 70/30 basis, where 70% of the marks is for theory and 30% is for practical. If it does not follow this division, then the scores will be adjusted to fit this ratio.

Mathematical Science courses

There are four Mathematical Science courses, such as Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. Mathematics is mandatory to apply for these.

The best of four for these courses is calculated as the aggregate of your scores in one language subject, Mathematics and the scores of any two subjects from List A.

List A is a compilation of academic courses, published by the DU. If any of the elective courses do not fall in list A, then 2.5% will be deducted from your aggregate.

DU

Arts Courses

There are many BA (Hons) and BA programmes that applicants can choose from. The best of four for BA (Hons) programme is calculated as aggregate of the scores in a language subject, the subject in which you would like to do your honours program in and any two subjects from List A.

If you do not include the subject in which you want to do the honours programme in, or if your electives are not from List A, then 2.5% each will be deducted for these.

Commerce courses

Delhi University is well known for its B Com (Hons) and B Com programmes. Students should have studied Mathematics to apply for BCom (Hons).

Students need to use their scores in one language subject (either English or Hindi) and select three subjects from lists C1 or C2 to get their best four score. Like List A, these are compilations of subjects that are prepared by the DU.

However, here there is a small catch. If all three elective courses are from List C1, then the student would not face ant deduction. But for each subject taken from List C2, there will be a deduction of 1%.

 

DU admissions: Keep your documents handy, get the best of four calculation right

Gear up to grab a seat at their dream college as Delhi University (DU) released its first cutoff list on Friday evening.

The admission process for the first cutoff list will be on from June 24 to June 28, following which the university will release its second list on July 1.

HT spoke to a few DU students who shared their experience of struggling to find the way to offices in colleges, losing their original certificates to hiring e-rickshaw drivers as guardians to get rooms in hostels.

Many students recounted the first day of admission to be full of struggle. “The first day of admissions was such a blur. I kept getting lost in the college campus and had to try really hard to find my way back to the admin office each time,” said Divya Ahuja from Shri Ram College of Commerce.

Akshay Mehta from Hans Raj College said that many out-station students, who did not go through the dates and guidelines, faced many issues. “I am from Kolkata and I didn’t know that the day the cutoff list is out, it is also the first day of admissions. So, one day I’m sitting at home and the next, I’m boarding a flight to Delhi because I am already a day late for admissions,” he said.

On a lighter note, an outstation student further said, “I have friends who have had to hire e-rickshaw drivers as local guardians to get admission into the hostel as that is a requirement.”

The best four calculations can leave the best of applicants stumped, so you may want to pay close attention to the norms to avoid mistakes.

“After confirming my admission in a college after the first cutoff by four teachers in the panel, getting my documents attested for BSc (H) Statistics, waiting for four hours and completing the whole procedure, the last teacher in the panel says ‘Sorry, you are 0.25% short’,” said Anjali Sharma, a student of College of Vocational Studies.

Many students also reported losing original documents during the admission process.

DU

Nikita Gupta from Lady Shri Ram Collegeg said, “When the second list of cut offs was released, I had gone to a DU college to withdraw my admission so that I could migrate to LSR. It turned out that the college had lost my original documents and I had to search for them all by myself.”

Unfortunately, Gupta is not alone; students like Vaishnavi Gosain from Atma Ram Sanatan Dharam College have also had similar experiences.

“I cried for an hour in front of the administration staff of the college because after standing in a queue for three hours to get myself admitted, I found out that they had misplaced my original certificates. They found them later but till then I had made up my mind to not to take admission in this college,” she said.

There were some who faced issues as they had uploaded incorrect documents, while others had to prove that they were aspirants and not parents to enter the college.

“In my DU form I uploaded my original birth certificate as proof of birth and completed the process, only to realise a day before the deadline that it was the Class 10 marksheet which was required as date of birth proof. I had to redo the form all over again,” he said.

Sanket Aggarwal from CVS was stopped at the gate just because of his appearance. “I have a very tall and muscular build and I like to keep a well groomed beard. So, when I went to Maharaja Agrasen College, the guard stopped me and asked ‘Aapka bacha kahan hai? Parents are not allowed inside.’ I was stunned and had to show him all my documents to prove that I was a student,” said Aggarwal.

 

CBSE NEET 2017: Meet the four toppers from Muktsar, Indore and Bengaluru

New Delhi: The 17-year-old son of a Punjab school teacher, two close friends from Madhya Pradesh and a Delhi Public School student from Bengaluru, on Friday, bagged the first four positions in the National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET), an all-India examination for admission to medical and dental colleges.

The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE), which conducts the examination, announced the results on Friday morning, ending weeks of suspense that saw the Madras high court withholding the outcome before the Supreme Court cleared it.

Launched in 2016, the NEET replaced a clutch of entrance exams conducted by states and colleges.

There were more successful women than men, the results show, with 3.45 lakh clearing the exams out of 6.16 lakh who wrote it. About 2.66 lakh men out of 4.73 who gave the exam were successful.

Five transgenders out of eight candidates also passed the exam held on May 7, the CSBE said.

Topper Navdeep Singh plans to pursue an MBBS degree from Maulana Azad Medical College in Delhi, his father, Gopal Singh, told HT at their home in Mukstar, around 550 km from Chandigarh.

NEET results 2017

“I was hopeful of clearing the exam but I had not expected to become the all India topper,” said Navdeep, whose hobbies include playing cricket.

Two other students from Punjab were placed among the top ten, with Nikita Goyal securing position 8 and Tanish Bansal with rank 10.

The results were particularly sweet for the friends from Indore, Archit Gupta and Manish Mulchandani, who were placed second and third.

Both Gupta and Mulchandani left their homes to live in a hostel so that they could concentrate on their studies and motivate each other. They attended the same coaching institute. Gupta wants to be a neurosurgeon.

“Archit and I always compete with each other, but it is a healthy competition and helped us score well,” said Mulchandani, who will represent India in the Bio Olympiad in London on July 23.

Both were also placed among the top 10 of successful candidates in an entrance exam to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS).

Sankeerth Sadananda, ranked 4, is a Delhi Public School student from Bengaluru in Karnataka. Son of a company secretary father and biology teacher, he has always been interested in biology and has decided to focus on a career in health care.

Sadananda too has aced the AIIMS entrance exam, securing 27th rank . He secured 97 per cent in Class 12.

“It is a great feeling to have aced these exams and I am a little confused at the moment because of the choices I have,” he said.

However, his heart seems set on AIIMS. “I don’t think anybody can turn dow AIIMS,” he said.