Worried about early menopause? Eat the right foods to protect yourself

Early menopause is a serious concern. Research as indicated that it may predict heart diseaseand trigger old-age problems in women. Now, a new study says that high intake of barley, brown rice, oatmeal, soya and tofu over a long-term period may protect you from it.

The findings indicated that the women, who consume approximately 6.5% of their daily calories as vegetable protein had a significant 16% lower risk of early menopause compared to women whose intake was approximately 4% of calories. First author Maegan Boutot and Prof Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson conducted the study. The authors from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health explained that dietary vegetable protein intake is associated with ovarian aging and may identify ways for women to modify their risk of early onset of menopause and associated health conditions.

Soya

Early menopause, the cessation of ovarian function before age 45, affects about 10% of women and is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and early cognitive decline, the authors note. The team analysed 1,16,000 women aged 25-42 in 1989. The participants were asked to report how often they ate a single serving of 131 foods, beverages and supplements over the previous year, from “never or less than once a month” to “Six+ per day.”

For a woman with a 2,000 calorie per day diet, the authors explain, this is equal to three to four servings of such foods as enriched pasta, breakfast cereal, tofu and nuts, or about 32.5 grams a day. The authors explained that women consuming nine or more percent of their calories from vegetable protein had a hazard ratio of 0.41 (95 percent confidence interval = 0.19-0.88)” compared to those eating less than 4%. The research appeared in the online edition of journal of Epidemiology.

 

Delhi University admissions: Get your best four score right to book your seat

Now that the Delhi University has announced its first list of cutoffs for admission in its colleges, all that is standing between applicants and a seat in their preferred college is your ‘best four’ score.

Students have until June 28 to visit colleges and secure a seat in these highly sought-after colleges. However, one must first calculate the ‘best four’ score to ascertain if they have cleared the cutoff grade to be eligible for one of the 56,000 seats available in 63 DU colleges.

DU asks its students to calculate the aggregate of the ‘best four’ subjects, to see if they qualify for admission based on the cutoff. This may sound simple enough, but with different courses having different requirements for calculating the best four, this process can get daunting.

You can find the different guidelines for different courses given below:

Science courses

For most Bachelor of Science courses, Physics and Chemistry are mandatory. If the course has a Biology component, such as Zoology or Botany (Hons) courses, then you would need to have done Biology too. For some other courses Mathematics is mandatory.

A few courses such as Biotechnology, etc, will require both Biology and Mathematics.

These courses will be used to calculate your best of four score and the scores for these subjects should have been on a 70/30 basis, where 70% of the marks is for theory and 30% is for practical. If it does not follow this division, then the scores will be adjusted to fit this ratio.

Mathematical Science courses

There are four Mathematical Science courses, such as Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. Mathematics is mandatory to apply for these.

The best of four for these courses is calculated as the aggregate of your scores in one language subject, Mathematics and the scores of any two subjects from List A.

List A is a compilation of academic courses, published by the DU. If any of the elective courses do not fall in list A, then 2.5% will be deducted from your aggregate.

DU

Arts Courses

There are many BA (Hons) and BA programmes that applicants can choose from. The best of four for BA (Hons) programme is calculated as aggregate of the scores in a language subject, the subject in which you would like to do your honours program in and any two subjects from List A.

If you do not include the subject in which you want to do the honours programme in, or if your electives are not from List A, then 2.5% each will be deducted for these.

Commerce courses

Delhi University is well known for its B Com (Hons) and B Com programmes. Students should have studied Mathematics to apply for BCom (Hons).

Students need to use their scores in one language subject (either English or Hindi) and select three subjects from lists C1 or C2 to get their best four score. Like List A, these are compilations of subjects that are prepared by the DU.

However, here there is a small catch. If all three elective courses are from List C1, then the student would not face ant deduction. But for each subject taken from List C2, there will be a deduction of 1%.

 

DU admissions: Keep your documents handy, get the best of four calculation right

Gear up to grab a seat at their dream college as Delhi University (DU) released its first cutoff list on Friday evening.

The admission process for the first cutoff list will be on from June 24 to June 28, following which the university will release its second list on July 1.

HT spoke to a few DU students who shared their experience of struggling to find the way to offices in colleges, losing their original certificates to hiring e-rickshaw drivers as guardians to get rooms in hostels.

Many students recounted the first day of admission to be full of struggle. “The first day of admissions was such a blur. I kept getting lost in the college campus and had to try really hard to find my way back to the admin office each time,” said Divya Ahuja from Shri Ram College of Commerce.

Akshay Mehta from Hans Raj College said that many out-station students, who did not go through the dates and guidelines, faced many issues. “I am from Kolkata and I didn’t know that the day the cutoff list is out, it is also the first day of admissions. So, one day I’m sitting at home and the next, I’m boarding a flight to Delhi because I am already a day late for admissions,” he said.

On a lighter note, an outstation student further said, “I have friends who have had to hire e-rickshaw drivers as local guardians to get admission into the hostel as that is a requirement.”

The best four calculations can leave the best of applicants stumped, so you may want to pay close attention to the norms to avoid mistakes.

“After confirming my admission in a college after the first cutoff by four teachers in the panel, getting my documents attested for BSc (H) Statistics, waiting for four hours and completing the whole procedure, the last teacher in the panel says ‘Sorry, you are 0.25% short’,” said Anjali Sharma, a student of College of Vocational Studies.

Many students also reported losing original documents during the admission process.

Nikita Gupta from Lady Shri Ram Collegeg said, “When the second list of cut offs was released, I had gone to a DU college to withdraw my admission so that I could migrate to LSR. It turned out that the college had lost my original documents and I had to search for them all by myself.”

Unfortunately, Gupta is not alone; students like Vaishnavi Gosain from Atma Ram Sanatan Dharam College have also had similar experiences.

“I cried for an hour in front of the administration staff of the college because after standing in a queue for three hours to get myself admitted, I found out that they had misplaced my original certificates. They found them later but till then I had made up my mind to not to take admission in this college,” she said.

DU

There were some who faced issues as they had uploaded incorrect documents, while others had to prove that they were aspirants and not parents to enter the college.

“In my DU form I uploaded my original birth certificate as proof of birth and completed the process, only to realise a day before the deadline that it was the Class 10 marksheet which was required as date of birth proof. I had to redo the form all over again,” he said.

Sanket Aggarwal from CVS was stopped at the gate just because of his appearance. “I have a very tall and muscular build and I like to keep a well groomed beard. So, when I went to Maharaja Agrasen College, the guard stopped me and asked ‘Aapka bacha kahan hai? Parents are not allowed inside.’ I was stunned and had to show him all my documents to prove that I was a student,” said Aggarwal.

 

 

Delhi University admissions: Get your best four score right to book your seat

Now that the Delhi University has announced its first list of cutoffs for admission in its colleges, all that is standing between applicants and a seat in their preferred college is your ‘best four’ score.

Students have until June 28 to visit colleges and secure a seat in these highly sought-after colleges. However, one must first calculate the ‘best four’ score to ascertain if they have cleared the cutoff grade to be eligible for one of the 56,000 seats available in 63 DU colleges.

DU asks its students to calculate the aggregate of the ‘best four’ subjects, to see if they qualify for admission based on the cutoff. This may sound simple enough, but with different courses having different requirements for calculating the best four, this process can get daunting.

You can find the different guidelines for different courses given below:

Science courses

For most Bachelor of Science courses, Physics and Chemistry are mandatory. If the course has a Biology component, such as Zoology or Botany (Hons) courses, then you would need to have done Biology too. For some other courses Mathematics is mandatory.

A few courses such as Biotechnology, etc, will require both Biology and Mathematics.

These courses will be used to calculate your best of four score and the scores for these subjects should have been on a 70/30 basis, where 70% of the marks is for theory and 30% is for practical. If it does not follow this division, then the scores will be adjusted to fit this ratio.

Mathematical Science courses

There are four Mathematical Science courses, such as Mathematics, Statistics, Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. Mathematics is mandatory to apply for these.

The best of four for these courses is calculated as the aggregate of your scores in one language subject, Mathematics and the scores of any two subjects from List A.

List A is a compilation of academic courses, published by the DU. If any of the elective courses do not fall in list A, then 2.5% will be deducted from your aggregate.

DU

Arts Courses

There are many BA (Hons) and BA programmes that applicants can choose from. The best of four for BA (Hons) programme is calculated as aggregate of the scores in a language subject, the subject in which you would like to do your honours program in and any two subjects from List A.

If you do not include the subject in which you want to do the honours programme in, or if your electives are not from List A, then 2.5% each will be deducted for these.

Commerce courses

Delhi University is well known for its B Com (Hons) and B Com programmes. Students should have studied Mathematics to apply for BCom (Hons).

Students need to use their scores in one language subject (either English or Hindi) and select three subjects from lists C1 or C2 to get their best four score. Like List A, these are compilations of subjects that are prepared by the DU.

However, here there is a small catch. If all three elective courses are from List C1, then the student would not face ant deduction. But for each subject taken from List C2, there will be a deduction of 1%.

 

DU admissions: Keep your documents handy, get the best of four calculation right

Gear up to grab a seat at their dream college as Delhi University (DU) released its first cutoff list on Friday evening.

The admission process for the first cutoff list will be on from June 24 to June 28, following which the university will release its second list on July 1.

HT spoke to a few DU students who shared their experience of struggling to find the way to offices in colleges, losing their original certificates to hiring e-rickshaw drivers as guardians to get rooms in hostels.

Many students recounted the first day of admission to be full of struggle. “The first day of admissions was such a blur. I kept getting lost in the college campus and had to try really hard to find my way back to the admin office each time,” said Divya Ahuja from Shri Ram College of Commerce.

Akshay Mehta from Hans Raj College said that many out-station students, who did not go through the dates and guidelines, faced many issues. “I am from Kolkata and I didn’t know that the day the cutoff list is out, it is also the first day of admissions. So, one day I’m sitting at home and the next, I’m boarding a flight to Delhi because I am already a day late for admissions,” he said.

On a lighter note, an outstation student further said, “I have friends who have had to hire e-rickshaw drivers as local guardians to get admission into the hostel as that is a requirement.”

The best four calculations can leave the best of applicants stumped, so you may want to pay close attention to the norms to avoid mistakes.

“After confirming my admission in a college after the first cutoff by four teachers in the panel, getting my documents attested for BSc (H) Statistics, waiting for four hours and completing the whole procedure, the last teacher in the panel says ‘Sorry, you are 0.25% short’,” said Anjali Sharma, a student of College of Vocational Studies.

Many students also reported losing original documents during the admission process.

DU

Nikita Gupta from Lady Shri Ram Collegeg said, “When the second list of cut offs was released, I had gone to a DU college to withdraw my admission so that I could migrate to LSR. It turned out that the college had lost my original documents and I had to search for them all by myself.”

Unfortunately, Gupta is not alone; students like Vaishnavi Gosain from Atma Ram Sanatan Dharam College have also had similar experiences.

“I cried for an hour in front of the administration staff of the college because after standing in a queue for three hours to get myself admitted, I found out that they had misplaced my original certificates. They found them later but till then I had made up my mind to not to take admission in this college,” she said.

There were some who faced issues as they had uploaded incorrect documents, while others had to prove that they were aspirants and not parents to enter the college.

“In my DU form I uploaded my original birth certificate as proof of birth and completed the process, only to realise a day before the deadline that it was the Class 10 marksheet which was required as date of birth proof. I had to redo the form all over again,” he said.

Sanket Aggarwal from CVS was stopped at the gate just because of his appearance. “I have a very tall and muscular build and I like to keep a well groomed beard. So, when I went to Maharaja Agrasen College, the guard stopped me and asked ‘Aapka bacha kahan hai? Parents are not allowed inside.’ I was stunned and had to show him all my documents to prove that I was a student,” said Aggarwal.